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WingtraOne GEN II helps researchers on US/Mexico border monitor landslide risks and more

WingtraOne GEN II UABC

The Los Laureles Canyon is a watershed in Tijuana, Mexico, situated right on the border with the US. Its population is expanding fast and based on poorly-planned infrastructure. For this reason, a lot of trash, pollution and sediment runs from this area into the sea.

The US spends upwards of 3 million USD every year cleaning the debris that flows into a nearby estuary, which is protected for its ecological value. More than this, however, the area is highly vulnerable to erosion and landslides.* So research is now focused on this area to optimize its management.

WingtraOne GEN II—and its sensors, including the oblique camera setup—is helping us to visualize the landscape and marine environments to better understand the flows of water, sediment and contaminants flowing into the ocean.

Napoleon Gudino-Elinzondo, PhD
Researcher, Oceanological Research Institute at the Autonomous University of Baja California (UABC)

Gudino-Elizondo’s lab at the institute houses a range of projects. He relies on WingtraOne GEN II with the Oblique Sony a6100 payload for land modeling and erosion tracking. To track sediment or blooms in the water or along the coastline, he flies with the Sony RX1R II high-resolution RGB payload. And to monitor pollution on the beaches, he turns to the MicaSense RedEdge-MX multispectral payload.

“We can map the whole area in three days with the GEN II,” he said. “Otherwise, using conventional drones, we would need weeks or one month. The different payloads help us to analyze different coastal processes.”

*For more in-depth understanding, see the research publication here.

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